Analysis of Thoracic Spine Thrust Manipulation for Reducing Neck Pain

  • Ferreira L
  • Santos L
  • Pereira W
 et al. 
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Abstract

[Purpose] The cervical spine is a common site of pain, which may arise from different parts of the upper limbs or dysfunctions of the upper thoracic spine. The different sections of the spinal column are interlinked, and one region exerts an influence over another. Thus, a low range of motion (hypomobility) in the thoracic spine is an indicator of neck pain, and alterations in the cervical spine can occur due to dysfunctions of the thoracic region. The aim of the present study was to assess the efficacy of upper thoracic spine (T1-T4) thrust manipulation with regard to reduction of pain and disability in patients with neck pain. [Subjects and Methods] Twenty-five individuals with persistent neck pain upon movement participated in this study. The individuals were evaluated using the Neck Disability Index and a visual analog scale for pain. Each individual underwent five sessions of thoracic spine thrust manipulation. Data analysis involved the Student's t-test. [Results] Significant improvements were found in neck pain and disability. [Conclusion] Based on the results of the present study, thoracic spine thrust manipulation proved effective in the treatment of individuals with neck pain, leading to a reduction in both pain and disability.

Author-supplied keywords

  • Neck pain
  • Thoracic spine thrust manipulation

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Authors

  • Luiz Alfredo Braun Ferreira

  • Lucas Cristiano Fath Santos

  • Wagner Menna Pereira

  • Hugo Pasini Neto

  • Luanda André College Grecco

  • Thaluanna Calil Lourenço Christovão

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