Biodiversity Conservation in the REDD

  • Paoli G
  • Wells P
  • Meijaard E
 et al. 
  • 279

    Readers

    Mendeley users who have this article in their library.
  • 42

    Citations

    Citations of this article.

Abstract

Deforestation and forest degradation in the tropics is a major source of global greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions. The tropics also harbour more than half the world's threatened species, raising the possibility that reducing GHG emissions by curtailing tropical deforestation could provide substantial co-benefits for biodiversity conservation. Here we explore the potential for such co-benefits in Indonesia, a leading source of GHG emissions from land cover and land use change, and among the most species-rich countries in the world. We show that focal ecosystems for interventions to reduce emissions from deforestation and forest degradation in Indonesia do not coincide with areas supporting the most species-rich communities or highest concentration of threatened species. We argue that inherent trade-offs among ecosystems in emission reduction potential, opportunity cost of foregone development and biodiversity values will require a regulatory framework to balance emission reduction interventions with biodiversity co-benefit targets. We discuss how such a regulatory framework might function, and caution that pursuing emission reduction strategies without such a framework may undermine, not enhance, long-term prospects for biodiversity conservation in the tropics.

Get free article suggestions today

Mendeley saves you time finding and organizing research

Sign up here
Already have an account ?Sign in

Find this document

Authors

  • Gary D. Paoli

  • Philip L. Wells

  • Erik Meijaard

  • Matthew J. Struebig

  • Andrew J. Marshall

  • Krystof Obidzinski

Cite this document

Choose a citation style from the tabs below

Save time finding and organizing research with Mendeley

Sign up for free