Bumblebee foraging responses to variation in floral scent and color in snapdragons (Antirrhinum: Scrophulariaceae)

  • Odell E
  • Raguso R
  • Jones K
  • 72

    Readers

    Mendeley users who have this article in their library.
  • 31

    Citations

    Citations of this article.

Abstract

JSTOR is a not-for-profit service that helps scholars, researchers, and students discover, use, and build upon a wide range of content in a trusted digital archive. We use information technology and tools to increase productivity and facilitate new forms of scholarship. For more information about JSTOR, please contact support@jstor.org. The University of Notre Dame is collaborating with JSTOR to digitize, preserve and extend access to The American Midland Naturalist This content downloaded from 137.222.174.48 on Tue, 16 Aug 2016 15:49:23 UTC All use subject to http://about.jstor.org/terms ABSTRACT.-We examined the roles of floral scent and color in attracting bumblebees (Bombus spp.) to snapdragon flowers (Antirrhinum, Sonnet cultivar). Corolla color differ-ences covaried with differences in floral scent emissions in two inbred lines of snapdragon. White-flowered plants emitted methyl cinnamate, a scent compound not produced by yellow flowered plants, but lacked methyl benzoate, one of the major floral volatiles of the yellow-flowered line. Qualitative scent differences between the two lines were eliminated by applying the complementary scent compounds to filter paper wicks placed within the corollas. Lab-oratory analyses were performed using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry to verify ap-propriate modification of floral scents by this method. Two randomized arrays of control and scent-augmented flowers were visited by freely-foraging bumblebees in subalpine mead-ows in Colorado. Overall, yellow-flowered plants received more pollinator visits and had more flowers foraged per plant visit than did white-flowered plants. The addition of sweet-smelling methyl benzoate or spicy methyl cinnamate neither stimulated nor deterred bumblebee visits to either flower color.

Get free article suggestions today

Mendeley saves you time finding and organizing research

Sign up here
Already have an account ?Sign in

Find this document

Get full text

Authors

  • Eric Odell

  • Robert A Raguso

  • Kristina N Jones

Cite this document

Choose a citation style from the tabs below

Save time finding and organizing research with Mendeley

Sign up for free