Characterization of testudine melanomacrophage linear, membrane extension processes - Cablepodia - by phase and atomic force microscopy

  • Johnson J
  • Nettikadan S
  • Vengasandra S
 et al. 
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Abstract

Melanomacrophages (MMs) are a component of an internal, pigmented cell system in liver and splenic tissues of some fishes, anurans, and reptiles. The cells have been found in centers or aggregates in sinusoids and are associated with ceils capable of producing a peptide cytokine and immunoglobulins. A unique cell extension process has been observed in turtle MMs placed into cell culture, and this process has been studied by light and atomic force microscopy. These structures, referred to as cablepodia, are uniquely straight, narrow, and unbranching and appear to originate from growth cones opposite lamellipodia. Cablepodia were found to connect with other turtle MMs and fibroblasts forming cell net- works. Dividing fibroblasts to which a cablepodium attached ceased cell division. The observations collectively suggest that a principal reason for aggregations of MMs in internal organs of lower vertebrates is their ability to form intercon- nected networks of cell processes for trapping and processing of particulate matter, ceils, and infectious organisms and, possibly, for the communication of cell signals and transfer of intracellular materials. Key

Author-supplied keywords

  • cell networks
  • extension fibrils
  • in vitro cell morphology
  • inhibition of cell division
  • melanmnacrophage centers
  • pigmented cells

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Authors

  • James C Johnson

  • Saju R Nettikadan

  • Srikanth G Vengasandra

  • Sai Lovan

  • James Muys

  • Eric Henderson

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