Children, adolescents, obesity, and the media.

  • American Academy of Pediatrics C
  • Media
  • Mulligan D
 et al. 
  • 1

    Readers

    Mendeley users who have this article in their library.
  • N/A

    Citations

    Citations of this article.

Abstract

Obesity has become a worldwide public health problem. Considerable research has shown that the media contribute to the development of child and adolescent obesity, although the exact mechanism remains unclear. Screen time may displace more active pursuits, advertising of junk food and fast food increases children's requests for those particular foods and products, snacking increases while watching TV or movies, and late-night screen time may interfere with getting adequate amounts of sleep, which is a known risk factor for obesity. Sufficient evidence exists to warrant a ban on junk-food or fast-food advertising in children's TV programming. Pediatricians need to ask 2 questions about media use at every well-child or well-adolescent visit: (1) How much screen time is being spent per day? and (2) Is there a TV set or Internet connection in the child's bedroom?

Author-supplied keywords

  • Adolescent
  • Advertising as Topic
  • Child
  • Diet
  • Humans
  • Obesity
  • Obesity: epidemiology
  • Obesity: prevention & control
  • Television
  • Television: statistics & numerical data
  • active video games
  • birth cohort
  • body-mass index
  • cardiovascular-disease risk
  • childhood obesity
  • junk food
  • media
  • obesity
  • overweight
  • physical-activity
  • screen time
  • sedentary behavior
  • television
  • television food advertisements
  • united-states

Get free article suggestions today

Mendeley saves you time finding and organizing research

Sign up here
Already have an account ?Sign in

Find this document

Authors

  • Council on Communications American Academy of Pediatrics

  • Media

  • D A Mulligan

  • T R Altmann

  • A Brown

  • D A Christakis

Cite this document

Choose a citation style from the tabs below

Save time finding and organizing research with Mendeley

Sign up for free