College Students' Social Justice Interest and Commitment: A Social-Cognitive Perspective

  • Miller M
  • Sendrowitz K
  • Connacher C
 et al. 
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Abstract

In this study, the authors examined the degree to which social-cognitive career theory (SCCT; R. W. Lent, S. D. Brown, & G. Hackett, 1994) explained the development of social justice interest and commitment. Data from 274 college students and latent variable path modeling were used to test theoretically and empirically derived SCCT direct and indirect effects structural models. The direct effects model estimated the direct effect of social supports and barriers on social justice commitment and the indirect effects model estimated the effect of social supports and barriers indirectly through self-efficacy. Overall, the present findings supported the use of SCCT within the social justice domain, as social justice self-efficacy and outcome expectations were useful in explaining the development of college students’ social justice interest and commitment. The present findings supported the indirect effects model of social justice interest and commitment over the direct effects model. Finally, unique to prior tests of SCCT in vocational and academic domains, social supports and barriers exhibited an indirect effect on commitment through outcome expectations. Study limitations, future directions for research, and implications for facilitating college students’ social justice interest and commitment are discussed.

Author-supplied keywords

  • social cognitive career theory
  • social justice commitment
  • social justice interest

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Authors

  • Matthew J. Miller

  • Kerrin Sendrowitz

  • Christopher Connacher

  • Susana Blanco

  • Cristina Muñiz de la Peña

  • Shaina Bernardi

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