The Convention on the Protection of the Underwater Cultural Heritage

  • Scovazzi T
  • 2

    Readers

    Mendeley users who have this article in their library.
  • N/A

    Citations

    Citations of this article.

Abstract

Assesses the usefulness of the UNESCO Convention on the Protection of the Underwater Cultural Heritage (CPUCH), drawn up in Paris in 2001. The convention's merit can be seen when compared to a predecessor, the United Nations Convention on the Law of the Sea (UNCLOS) of 1982, which the author sees as incomplete, ambiguous, and counterproductive. The broad content of the latter regarding duty, jurisdiction, and rights leaves massive loopholes, and its vague logic ultimately puts underwater cultural heritage at risk. The author sees the CPUCH as a possible defense against the weaknesses of UNCLOS; its wording and logic are more precise, and its mandate to strengthen regional cooperation is more determined.

Author-supplied keywords

  • charters
  • conservation policy
  • international agreements
  • international law
  • legislation (legal concepts)
  • underwater archaeology
  • underwater sites

Get free article suggestions today

Mendeley saves you time finding and organizing research

Sign up here
Already have an account ?Sign in

Find this document

Authors

  • Tullio Scovazzi

Cite this document

Choose a citation style from the tabs below

Save time finding and organizing research with Mendeley

Sign up for free