In defense of Milankovitch

  • Roe G
  • 160

    Readers

    Mendeley users who have this article in their library.
  • 50

    Citations

    Citations of this article.

Abstract

The Milankovitch hypothesis is widely held to be one of the cornerstones of climate science. Surprisingly, the hypothesis remains not clearly defined despite an extensive body of research on the link between global ice volume and insolation changes arising from variations in the Earth's orbit. In this paper, a specific hypothesis is formulated. Basic physical arguments are used to show that, rather than focusing on the absolute global ice volume, it is much more informative to consider the time rate of change of global ice volume. This simple and dynamically-logical change in perspective is used to show that the available records support a direct, zero-lag, antiphased relationship between the rate of change of global ice volume and summertime insolation in the northern high latitudes. Furthermore, variations in atmospheric CO2 appear to lag the rate of change of global ice volume. This implies only a secondary role for CO2 - variations in which produce a weaker radiative forcing than the orbitally-induced changes in summertime insolation - in driving changes in global ice volume. Copyright 2006 by the American Geophysical Union.

Get free article suggestions today

Mendeley saves you time finding and organizing research

Sign up here
Already have an account ?Sign in

Find this document

Authors

  • Gerard Roe

Cite this document

Choose a citation style from the tabs below

Save time finding and organizing research with Mendeley

Sign up for free