Differential judgement of static facial expressions of emotions in three cultures

  • Huang Y
  • Tang S
  • Helmeste D
 et al. 
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Abstract

Judging facial expressions of emotions has important clinical value in the assessment of psychiatric patients. Judging facial emotional expressions in foreign patients however, is not always easy. Controversy has existed in previous reports on cultural differences in identifying static facial expressions of emotions. While it has been argued that emotional expressions on the face are universally recognized, experimental data obtained were not necessarily totally supportive. Using the data reported in the literature, our previous pilot study showed that the Japanese interpreted many emotional expressions differently from US viewers of the same emotions. In order to explore such discrepancies further, we conducted the same experiments on Chinese Ss (aged 20-37 yrs) residing in Beijing. The data showed that, similar to the Japanese viewers, Chinese viewers also judged many static facial emotional expressions differently from US viewers. The combined results of the Chinese and the Japanese experiments suggest a major cross-cultural difference between American and Asian viewers in identifying some static facial emotional expressions, particularly when the posed emotion has negative connotations. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2012 APA, all rights reserved)

Author-supplied keywords

  • Cross-culture difference
  • Facial expression
  • Negative emotional expression
  • Positive emotional expression

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Authors

  • Yueqin Huang

  • Siu Tang

  • Daiga Helmeste

  • Toshiki Shioiri

  • Toshiyuki Someya

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