Dissociation and dissociative disorders: Challenging conventional wisdom

  • Lynn S
  • Lilienfeld S
  • Merckelbach H
 et al. 
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Abstract

Conventional wisdom holds that dissociation is a coping mechanism triggered by exposure to intense stressors. Drawing on recent research from multiple laboratories, we challenge this prevailing posttraumatic model of dissociation and dissociative disorders. Proponents of this model hold that dissociation and dissociative disorders are associated with (a) intense objective stressors (e.g., childhood trauma), (b) serious cognitive deficits that impede processing of emotionally laden information, and (c) an avoidant information-processing style characterized by a tendency to forget painful memories. We review findings that contradict these widely accepted assumptions and argue that a sociocognitive model better accounts for the extant data. We further propose a perspective on dissociation based on a recently established link between a labile sleepwake cycle and memory errors, cognitive failures, problems in attentional control, and difficulties in distinguishing fantasy from reality. We conclude that this perspective may help to reconcile the posttraumatic and sociocognitive models of dissociation and dissociative disorders.

Author-supplied keywords

  • dissociation
  • dissociative disorder
  • dissociative identity disorder
  • trauma

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Authors

  • Steven Jay Lynn

  • Scott O. Lilienfeld

  • Harald Merckelbach

  • Timo Giesbrecht

  • Dalena van der Kloet

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