Ecological characteristics of old-growth Douglas-fir forests.

  • Franklin J
  • Denison W
  • McKee A
 et al. 
  • 84

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Abstract

Old-growth coniferous forests differ significantly from young-growth forests in species composition, function (rate and paths of energy flow and nutrient and water cycling), function (rate and paths of energy flow and nutrient and water cycling), and structure. Most differences can be related to four key structural components of old growth: large live trees, large snags, large logs on components of old growth: large live trees, large snags, large logs on land, and large logs in streams. Foresters wishing to maintain old-growth forest ecosystems can key management schemes to these structural components.

Author-supplied keywords

  • Douglas-fir
  • Ecosystems
  • Pseudotsuga menziesii
  • Tsuga heterophylla
  • old-growth stands
  • stand composition
  • stand structure
  • western hemlock

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Authors

  • Jerry F Franklin

  • William Denison

  • Arthur McKee

  • Chris Maser

  • James Sedell

  • Fred Swanson

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