The Economies of Two-Sided Markets

  • Rysman M
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Abstract

JSTOR is a not-for-profit service that helps scholars, researchers, and students discover, use, and build upon a wide range of content in a trusted digital archive. We use information technology and tools to increase productivity and facilitate new forms of scholarship. For more information about JSTOR, please contact support@jstor.org. At a local Best Buy, a child places a new Sony PlayStation 3 on the cashier's counter while the parents dig out their Visa card. The gaming system and the payment card may appear to have little connection other than this purchase. However, these two items share an important characteristic that is generating a series of economic insights and has important implications for stra tegic decision making and economic policymaking. Both video game systems and payment cards are examples of two-sided markets. Broadly speaking, a two-sided market is one in which 1) two sets of agents interact through an intermediary or platform, and 2) the decisions of each set of agents affects the outcomes of the other set of agents, typically through an externality. In the case of a video game system, the intermediary is the console producer?Sony in the scenario above?while the two sets of agents are consumers and video game developers. Neither consumers nor game developers will be

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Authors

  • Marc Rysman

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