Effect of an invasive grass on ambient rates of decomposition and microbial community structure: A search for causality

  • Holly D
  • Ervin G
  • Jackson C
 et al. 
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Abstract

In situ decomposition of above and below- ground plant biomass of the native grass species Andropogon glomeratus (Walt.) B.S.P. and exotic Imperata cylindrica (L.) Beauv. (cogongrass) was investigated using litter bags over the course of a 12 month period. The above and belowground bio- mass of the invasive I. cylindrica always decomposed faster than that of the native A. glomeratus. Also, belowground biomass of both species decomposed at a consistently faster rate when placed within an invaded area consisting of a monotypic stand of I. cylindrica as opposed to within a native plant assemblage.However, there was no similar such trend observed in the aboveground plant material. The microbial communi- ties associated with the invaded sites often differed from those found in the native vegetation and provide a possible causal mechanism by which to explain the observed differences in decomposition rates. The microbial communities differed not only composition- ally, as indicated by ordination analyses, but also functionally with respect to enzymatic activity essen- tial to the decomposition process. This study supports the growing consensus that invasive plant species alter normal ecological processes and highlights a possible mechanism (alteration of microbial assemblages) by which I. cylindrica may alter an ecosystem process (decomposition).

Author-supplied keywords

  • DGGE
  • Decomposition alteration
  • Ecosystem modification
  • Invasive plant species
  • Microbial community analyses
  • Microbial ecology
  • T-RFLP

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Authors

  • Grant KirkerUSDA Forest Products Laboratory

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  • D. Christopher Holly

  • Gary N. Ervin

  • Colin R. Jackson

  • Susan V. Diehl

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