The effect of the use of mouthwash on ethylglucuronide concentrations in urine

  • Costantino A
  • DiGregorio E
  • Korn W
 et al. 
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Abstract

Two studies were performed to evaluate the effect of alcohol containing mouthwash on the appearance of ethyl glucuronide (EtG) in urine. In the first study, 9 volunteers were given a 4-oz bottle of mouthwash, which contained 12% ethanol. They gargled with all 4 oz. of the mouthwash at intervals over a 15-min period. All urine samples were collected over the next 24 h. Of 39 provided urine samples, there were 20 > 50 ng/mL, 12 > 100 ng/mL, 5 > 200 ng/mL, 3 > 250 ng/mL, and 1 > 300 ng/mL. The peak concentrations were all within 12 h after the exposure. In the second study, 11 participants gargled 3 times daily for 5 days. The first morning void was collected. Sixteen of the 55 submitted samples contained EtG concentrations of greater than 50 ng/mL. All of them were less than 120 ng/mL. These studies show that incidental exposure to mouthwash containing 12% ethanol, when gargling according to the manufacturer's instructions, can result in urinary EtG values greater than 50 ng/mL. All specimens were negative for ethanol. The limits of detection and quantitation for the EtG testing were 50 ng/mL.

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Authors

  • Anthony Costantino

  • E. John DiGregorio

  • Warren Korn

  • Stephanie Spayd

  • Frederic Rieders

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