Effect of Total and Partial Substitution of Sodium Chloride on the Quality of Cheddar Cheese

  • Fitzgerald E
  • Buckley J
  • 13

    Readers

    Mendeley users who have this article in their library.
  • 67

    Citations

    Citations of this article.

Abstract

Cheddar cheese was manufactured to give 1.6% residual sodium chloride or equivalent amounts (ionic strength basis) of magnesium chloride, calcium chloride, potassium chloride, or 1:1 mixtures of sodium chloride and the chloride salt of magnesium, calcium, or potassium from two split batches of curd. Sensory evaluation after 4 mo ripening at 4°C showed that cheese salted solely with magnesium chloride, calcium chloride, or potassium chloride was extremely bitter and totally unacceptable. There was extensive lipolysis (as measured by free fatty acid development) in the cheese salted with magnesium chloride, calcium chloride, or potassium chloride. Proteolysis was highest in the cheese salted with calcium chloride and magnesium chloride. These cheese gave the lowest Instron values for firmness, hardness, and cuttability. Extensive proteolysis in these cheese may be partly due to the low salt in moisture. Taste panel scores for flavor and texture of the sodium chloride/calcium chloride and sodium chloride/magnesium chloride salted cheese were significantly lower than the scores for the control cheese. Scores for flavor and texture of the potassium chloride/sodium chloride salted cheese were not significantly different from scores of the control cheese.

Get free article suggestions today

Mendeley saves you time finding and organizing research

Sign up here
Already have an account ?Sign in

Find this document

Authors

  • E. Fitzgerald

  • J. Buckley

Cite this document

Choose a citation style from the tabs below

Save time finding and organizing research with Mendeley

Sign up for free