Effects of a classroom discourse intervention on teachers' practice and students' motivation to learn mathematics and science

  • Jang, H., Kim, E. J., & Reeve, J. (2016). Why students become more engaged or more disengaged during the semester: A self-determination theory dual-process model. Learning and Instruction, 43 2
  • Kanat-Maymon, Y., Benjamin, M., Stavsky, A., Shoshani, A., & Roth, G. (2015). The role of basic need fulfillment in academic dishonesty: A self-determination theory perspective. Contemporary Educational Psychology, 43 1
  • Wilding, L. (2015). The application of self-determination theory to support students experiencing disaffection. Educational Psychology in Practice, 31(2) 1
 et al. 
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Abstract

Student interest and motivation in STEM subjects has dropped significantly throughout secondary education, for which teacher-student interactions are named as a central reason. This study investigated whether a video-based teacher professional development (TPD) intervention on productive classroom discourse improved students' learning motivation and interest development over the course of a school year. The teachers' intervention group (IG; n=6) was compared with a control group (CG; n=4) who participated in a traditional TPD programme on classroom discourse. The teachers showed a significant increase in constructive feedback and decrease in simple feedback as a function of the treatment. Pre- and post-tests revealed that students in the IG (n=136) significantly increased their perceived autonomy, competence and intrinsic learning motivation as compared with those in the CG (n=90). They also showed significantly greater interest changes in the subjects compared with their peers in the CG. © 2014 Elsevier Ltd.

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Authors

  • 27–38. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.learninstruc.2016.01.002 Jang, H., Kim, E. J., & Reeve, J. (2016). Why students become more engaged or more disengaged during the semester: A self-determination theory dual-process model. Learning and Instruction, 43

  • 1–9. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.cedpsych.2015.08.002 Kanat-Maymon, Y., Benjamin, M., Stavsky, A., Shoshani, A., & Roth, G. (2015). The role of basic need fulfillment in academic dishonesty: A self-determination theory perspective. Contemporary Educational Psychology, 43

  • 137–149. https://doi.org/10.1080/02667363.2014.995154 Wilding, L. (2015). The application of self-determination theory to support students experiencing disaffection. Educational Psychology in Practice, 31(2)

  • 37–49. https://doi.org/10.1007/s11031-017-9654-2 Moore, E., Holding, A. C., Hope, N. H., Harvey, B., Powers, T. A., Zuroff, D., & Koestner, R. (2018). Perfectionism and the pursuit of personal goals: A self-determination theory analysis. Motivation and Emotion, 42(1)

  • 11–24. https://doi.org/10.1007/s11031-014-9427-0 Costa, S., Ntoumanis, N., & Bartholomew, K. J. (2014). Predicting the brighter and darker sides of interpersonal relationships: Does psychological need thwarting matter? Motivation and Emotion, 39(1)

  • 409–414. https://doi.org/10.7334/psicothema2014.76 Castillo, I., Tomás, I., Ntoumanis, N., Bartholomew, K., Duda, J. L., & Balaguer, I. (2014). Psychometric properties of the Spanish version of the controlling coach behaviors scale in the sport context [Propiedades psicométricas de la versión española de

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