Empathy and theory of mind in offenders with intellectual disability

  • Proctor T
  • Beail N
  • 10

    Readers

    Mendeley users who have this article in their library.
  • 19

    Citations

    Citations of this article.

Abstract

Background: Little research has been carried out on empathy and theory of mind in offenders with intellectual disability (ID) and these concepts are often poorly defined. Method: Various models of empathy and theory of mind are discussed and scores on 2 empathy and 3 theory of mind tasks are compared for 25 offenders with ID and 25 non-offenders with ID (all male). Results: Differences were found in empathy and theory of mind performance of offenders and non-offenders with ID. Offenders performed better than non-offenders on a second order theory of mind task and on emotion recognition. They required fewer prompts to mention emotions, and gave empathic/caring responses more often than non-offenders when observing happiness (but not sadness or anger). Conclusions: Results suggest that offenders with ID may have better, rather than poorer, empathy and theory of mind abilities than non-offenders, and that empathy training is therefore not indicated for this group. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2015 APA, all rights reserved)(journal abstract)

Author-supplied keywords

  • Empathy
  • Intellectual disability
  • Offenders
  • Theory of mind

Get free article suggestions today

Mendeley saves you time finding and organizing research

Sign up here
Already have an account ?Sign in

Find this document

Get full text

Authors

  • Tracey Proctor

  • Nigel Beail

Cite this document

Choose a citation style from the tabs below

Save time finding and organizing research with Mendeley

Sign up for free