No evidence for cognitive improvement from oral nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NADH) in dementia. Short communication

  • Rainer M
  • Kraxberger E
  • Haushofer M
 et al. 
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Abstract

Reduced nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NADH) is advertised as an over-the-counter product or dietary supplement to treat Alzheimer's disease. We performed a 3-month open-label study with oral 10 mg/day NADH with 25 patients with mild to moderate dementia of the Alzheimer, vascular, and fronto-temporal types in addition to their current cholinomimetic drug medication. In 19 patients who completed the study, we found no evidence for any cognitive effect as defined by established psychometric tests. We conclude that NADH is unlikely to achieve cognitive improvements in an extent reported earlier, and present theoretical arguments against an effectiveness of this compound in dementia disorders.

Author-supplied keywords

  • Alzheimer disease
  • Blood brain barrier
  • Dementia
  • Nicotinamide adenosine dinucleotide
  • Open clinical trial

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