Evidence for a strong genetic influence on childhood adiposity despite the force of the obesogenic environment

  • Yazdi F
  • Clee S
  • Meyre D
 et al. 
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Abstract

Body mass index (BMI), a simple anthropometric measure, is the most frequently used measure of adiposity and has been instrumental in documenting the worldwide increase in the prevalence of obesity witnessed during the last decades. Although this increase in overweight and obesity is thought to be mainly due to environmental changes, i.e., sedentary lifestyles and high caloric diets, consistent evidence from twin studies demonstrates high heritability and the importance of genetic differences for normal variation in BMI. We analysed self-reported data on BMI from approximately 37,000 complete twin pairs (including opposite sex pairs) aged 20-29 and 30-39 from eight different twin registries participating in the GenomEUtwin project. Quantitative genetic analyses were conducted and sex differences were explored. Variation in BMI was greater for women than for men, and in both sexes was primarily explained by additive genetic variance in all countries. Sex differences in the variance components were consistently significant. Results from analyses of opposite sex pairs also showed evidence of sex-specific genetic effects suggesting there may be some differences between men and women in the genetic factors that influence variation in BMI. These results encourage the continued search for genes of importance to the body composition and the development of obesity. Furthermore, they suggest that strategies to identify predisposing genes may benefit from taking into account potential sex specific effects.

Author-supplied keywords

  • 1
  • Accumulation curves
  • Adiposity
  • Adolescent
  • Adult
  • Aged
  • Algorithms
  • Animals
  • Antitumor antibodies
  • Asymptotic richness
  • BMI
  • Biodiversity
  • Body Mass Index
  • Body Weight
  • Body mass index
  • Brain
  • Brain: metabolism
  • Cancer
  • Category-subcategory ratios
  • Cell Line
  • Child
  • Childhood obesity
  • Communication in Health Care
  • Complementary
  • Complementary: metabolism
  • DNA
  • DNA Primers
  • Eating behavior
  • Editorial policies (including conflicts of interes
  • Essay
  • Fat
  • Female
  • Gene Expression Regulation
  • Gene × environment interaction
  • Genetic
  • Genetics
  • Genetics and Genomics
  • Genome-wide association
  • Glycaemic traits
  • Heritability
  • Humans
  • Immune suppression
  • Immune surveillance
  • Infant
  • Inflammation
  • Male
  • Mathematics/Statistics
  • Medical journals
  • Messenger
  • Messenger: analysis
  • Models
  • Newborn
  • Nutrition Surveys
  • Obesity
  • Obesity/*epidemiology
  • Oncoantigens
  • Pediatric Obesity/*epidemiology
  • Polymerase Chain Reaction
  • Polymerase Chain Reaction: methods
  • Preschool
  • Prevalence
  • Public Health and Epidemiology
  • RNA
  • Rarefaction
  • Rat
  • Reference Standards
  • Reproducibility of Results
  • Reverse Transcriptase Polymerase Chain Reaction
  • Reverse Transcriptase Polymerase Chain Reaction: s
  • Review
  • Richness estimation
  • Science Policy
  • Sensitivity and Specificity
  • Sequencing
  • Sex Distribution
  • Species density
  • Species richness
  • Statistical power
  • Stress
  • Sucrose
  • Systematic review
  • Taxon sampling
  • Taxonomic ratios
  • Theoretical
  • Time Factors
  • Transcription
  • Tumor vaccine
  • Twins
  • Type 2 diabetes
  • United States/epidemiology
  • Waist circumference
  • Weight gain
  • abbreviations
  • absorptiometry
  • accepted 5 march 2015
  • adolescents
  • adolescents have increased dramatically
  • aging
  • ancestry informative markers
  • and obesity
  • appetite
  • bia
  • biliopancreatic diversion and duodenal
  • bioelectrical impedance analysis
  • biologic pathways
  • bmi
  • body composition
  • body mass index
  • bpd-ds
  • child eating
  • childhood overweight
  • children
  • diet
  • disease prediction
  • doubled since 1980 in
  • dual-energy x-ray
  • dxa
  • eating behaviour
  • effective practice
  • emerging technologies
  • endoluminal surgery
  • england
  • environment interaction
  • ethnicity
  • ewl
  • excess weight loss
  • family study
  • food intake
  • fto
  • gene
  • gene x environment interactions
  • genetic admixture
  • genetic continuum
  • genetics
  • health survey for england
  • heritab
  • heritability
  • human
  • igb
  • integrative biology
  • international obesity task force
  • intragastric balloon
  • lagb
  • laparoscopic adjustable band
  • laparoscopic sleeve gastrectomy
  • lifestyle intervention
  • lsg
  • management
  • mendelian
  • molecular epidemiology
  • monogenic obesity
  • most will be observational
  • mouse
  • multiphase
  • north american children and
  • obesity
  • optimization intervention strategy
  • parent feeding practices
  • parent feeding styles
  • polygenic obesity
  • population trends
  • population weights have increased
  • positive selection
  • power
  • prevalence has more than
  • prevention
  • promising practice
  • published 24 march 2015
  • qmr
  • quantitative magnetic resonance
  • race
  • randomization
  • rates of overweight in
  • roux-en-y gastric bypass
  • rygb
  • s
  • ses
  • sft
  • should ideally be accompanied
  • since the 1970
  • skin fold thickness
  • statistical
  • steadily
  • structural equation model
  • submitted 28 december 2014
  • switch
  • synthesis review
  • systematic review
  • the united
  • toga
  • tracking
  • transoral
  • trends in adiposity in
  • twin study
  • undernutrition
  • underwater weighing
  • waist circumference
  • weight gain
  • weight management

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Authors

  • Fereshteh T. Yazdi

  • Susanne M. Clee

  • David Meyre

  • Cristen J. C.J. Willer

  • Cristen J. C.J. Willer

  • Elizabeth K. E.K. Speliotes

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