Fostering Marginalized Youths' Political Participation: Longitudinal Roles of Parental Political Socialization and Youth Sociopolitical Development

  • Diemer M
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This study examines the roles of parental political socialization and the moral commitment to change social inequalities in predicting marginalized youths' (defined here as lower-SES youth of color) political participation. These issues are examined by applying structural equation modeling to a longitudinal panel of youth. Because tests of measurement invariance suggested racial/ethnic heterogeneity, the structural model was fit separately for three racial/ethnic groups. For each group, parental political socialization: discussion predicted youths' commitment to produce social change and for two groups, longitudinally predicted political participation. This study contributes to the literature by examining civic/political participation among disparate racial/ethnic groups, addresses an open scholarly question (whether youths' commitment to create social change predicts their "traditional" participation), and emphasizes parents' role in fostering marginalized youths' civic and political participation.

Author-supplied keywords

  • Critical consciousness
  • Marginalized youth
  • Parental political socialization
  • Political participation
  • Sociopolitical development
  • Structural equation modeling

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  • Matthew A. Diemer

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