Future directions in... Friendship in childhood and early adolescence

  • Rubin K
  • Fredstrom B
  • Bowker J
 et al. 
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Abstract

The purpose of this brief essay is not to examine the voluminous extant and ever-growing literature on children's and young adolescents' friendships. Rather, we will focus on issues that require address should we wish to better understand all that which politicians, authors, musicians, and philosophers already appear to know so much about. Friendship is a significant and positive factor in the lives of children and adolescents. However, the world of children's and young adolescents' friendships is far more complex than typically portrayed in the peer relationships literature. Below, the reader will find a number of friendship-related questions and issues that, if addressed, could reveal new insights into the role that friendships play in the psychological, social, and emotional lives of children and adolescents. In summary, it would seem timely to more carefully examine the intricacies of successful friendships. It is probably the case that as many friendships are based on complementary needs as on reciprocity and/or homophily. And it is equally likely that this latter statement is more or less true at different ages and for the two sexes. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2016 APA, all rights reserved)

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Authors

  • Kenneth Rubin

  • Bridget Fredstrom

  • Julie Bowker

  • Aboud Azmitia Azmitia Berndt Bigelow Bukowski Cillessen French Furman Furman Graham Haselager Hodges Hodges Hofstede Howes Keller Krappman Ladd Laursen Maccoby Margie Markus Miell Nelson Newcomb Parker Parker Parsons Parsons Pettigrew Pettigrew Phillipsen Aboud

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