Identifying a cognitive impairment subgroup in adults with mood disorders

  • Iverson G
  • Brooks B
  • Langenecker S
 et al. 
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Abstract

Background: We hypothesized that only a minority of patients with mood disorders have measurable cognitive impairment, and this minority drives the small-to-medium effect sizes detected in group studies. Removal of this minority from group statistical analyses will illustrate that the majority appear to have broadly normal cognitive functioning. Methods: Participants were adults between the ages of 20 and 54, including 659 healthy control subjects, 84 unmedicated outpatients diagnosed with depression, 59 outpatients diagnosed with depression who were on medications at the time of the evaluation, and 43 outpatients with bipolar disorder. All completed the CNS Vital Signs computerized cognitive screening battery. Results: The prevalence rates of low cognitive test scores were calculated for the healthy control subjects and the patients with mood disorders. Having two scores at or below the 5th percentile occurred in 31.2% of the patients and only 8.2% of the control subjects [χ2(1) = 66.67, p

Author-supplied keywords

  • Bipolar disorder
  • Cognitive impairment
  • Computerized testing
  • Depression

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