The impact of stress in self- and peer assessment

  • Pope N
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Abstract

While a large amount of interest has been shown in the use of peer and self-assessment, few studies have considered the effect of stress on the students involved. None have considered whether the resultant stress itself might account for any noticeable improvements in student performance. The research presented in this paper addresses this question. An experimental design measured the effects of type of assessment and gender on student stress levels and performance. Results suggest that females are more stressed by self-assessment than males and that being subjected to self- and peer assessment, while more stressful, leads to improved student performance in summative tasks. ABSTRACT FROM AUTHOR Copyright of Assessment & Evaluation in Higher Education is the property of Routledge and its content may not be copied or emailed to multiple sites or posted to a listserv without the copyright holder's express written permission. However, users may print, download, or email articles for individual use. This abstract may be abridged. No warranty is given about the accuracy of the copy. Users should refer to the original published version of the material for the full abstract. (Copyright applies to all Abstracts) While a large amount of interest has been shown in the use of peer and self-assessment, few studies have considered the effect of stress on the students involved. None have considered whether the resultant stress itself might account for any noticeable improvements in student performance. The research presented in this paper addresses this question. An experimental design measured the effects of type of assessment and gender on student stress levels and performance. Results suggest that females are more stressed by self-assessment than males and that being subjected to self- and peer assessment, while more stressful, leads to improved student performance in summative tasks. ABSTRACT FROM AUTHOR Copyright of Assessment & Evaluation in Higher Education is the property of Routledge and its content may not be copied or emailed to multiple sites or posted to a listserv without the copyright holder's express written permission. However, users may print, download, or email articles for individual use. This abstract may be abridged. No warranty is given about the accuracy of the copy. Users should refer to the original published version of the material for the full abstract. (Copyright applies to all Abstracts)

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Authors

  • Nigel K Ll Pope

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