Skip to content
Journal article

Influence of the sunspot cycle on the Northern Hemisphere wintertime circulation from long upper-air data sets

Brugnara Y, Brönnimann S, Luterbacher J, Rozanov E ...see all

Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics, vol. 13, issue 13 (2013) pp. 6275-6288

  • 26

    Readers

    Mendeley users who have this article in their library.
  • 8

    Citations

    Citations of this article.
  • N/A

    Views

    ScienceDirect users who have downloaded this article.
Sign in to save reference

Abstract

Here we present a study of the 11 yr sunspot cy- cle’s imprint on the Northern Hemisphere atmospheric circu- lation, using three recently developed gridded upper-air data sets that extend back to the early twentieth century. We find a robust response of the tropospheric late-wintertime circula- tion to the sunspot cycle, independent from the data set. This response is particularly significant over Europe, although re- sults show that it is not directly related to a North Atlantic Oscillation (NAO) modulation; instead, it reveals a signif- icant connection to the more meridional Eurasian pattern (EU). The magnitude of mean seasonal temperature changes over the European land areas locally exceeds 1Kin the lower troposphere over a sunspot cycle. We also analyse surface data to address the question whether the solar signal over Europe is temporally stable for a longer 250 yr period. The results increase our confidence in the existence of an influence of the 11 yr cycle on the Euro- pean climate, but the signal is much weaker in the first half of the period compared to the second half. The last solar min- imum (2005 to 2010), which was not included in our anal- ysis, shows anomalies that are consistent with our statistical results for earlier solar minima.

Get free article suggestions today

Mendeley saves you time finding and organizing research

Sign up here
Already have an account ?Sign in

Find this document

Get full text

Authors

Cite this document

Choose a citation style from the tabs below