Learning to Love Globalization : Education and Individual Attitudes Toward International Trade

  • Verhoogen E
  • Baker A
  • O'Rouke K
 et al. 
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Abstract

Studies of “waves” of regime change, in which large numbers of countries experience similar political transitions at roughly similar periods of time, though once popular, have fallen from favor. Replacing the “third wave” arguments are several competing models relating domestic social structure—specifically, the distribution of income and factor ownership—to regime type.Ifany of thesedistributivemodelsofregimetypeiscorrect,thenglobaltrade hasanimportant explanatoryrole to play. Under factor-based models, changes in the world trading system will have systematic effects on regime dynamics. Trade openness determines labor’s factor income and ultimately its political power. As world trade expands and contracts, countries with similar labor endowments should experience similar regime pressures at the same time.We propose a novel empirical specification that addresses the endogeneity and data-quality problems plaguing previous efforts to examine these arguments.We investigate the conditional impact of the global trading systemon democratic transitions across 130 years and all of the states in the international system. Our findings cast doubt on the utility of factor-based models of democratization, despite their importance in fueling renewed interest in the topic.

Author-supplied keywords

  • ARGENTINA
  • D1
  • D31
  • DATA analysis
  • DEVELOPING countries
  • DEVELOPMENT economics
  • DISTRIBUTIVE justice
  • ECONOMETRICS
  • ECONOMIC development -- Political aspects
  • ECONOMIC development -- Social aspects
  • EQUALITY
  • Economic geography
  • F1
  • F11
  • F13
  • F14
  • F16
  • GLOBALIZATION
  • GLOBALIZATION -- Economic aspects
  • Household welfare
  • INCOME distribution
  • INTERNATIONAL relations
  • Income distribution
  • India
  • J3
  • LABOR unions
  • LATIN America
  • LIBERALIZATION (Finance)
  • MATHEMATICAL models
  • Mexico
  • NAFTA
  • O12
  • O15
  • POVERTY
  • Pass-through
  • Policy preferences
  • Political economy
  • R2
  • REFORMS
  • RESEARCH
  • Stolper–Samuelson Theorem
  • TARIFF
  • Trade
  • Trade and poverty
  • Trade liberalization
  • Trade reforms
  • WAGES
  • Wage differentials
  • Wages
  • Welfare distribution
  • accessibility
  • and subcontracting
  • belief formation
  • capital
  • commerce
  • concerns political preferences
  • consumption
  • contacted via
  • costa rica
  • countries
  • democracy
  • developing countries
  • direct investment
  • economic growth
  • expenditure
  • export processing zones
  • for workers in developing
  • foreign
  • foreign direct investment
  • globalization
  • government spending
  • hat are the implications
  • human development
  • icle
  • indices
  • inequality
  • international finance
  • labor rights
  • labor unions
  • labour
  • multinational corporations
  • multinational production
  • of global production and
  • on-line processing
  • persuasion
  • policy preferences
  • political clevages
  • political economy
  • poverty measurement
  • preference reversals
  • processes of
  • redistribution
  • remittances
  • rights
  • s abstract this review
  • social policy
  • social spending in developing
  • survey design
  • the author can be
  • the close relationship between
  • they come from
  • trade
  • we begin by documenting
  • what they are and
  • where
  • workers

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Authors

  • Eric A. Verhoogen

  • Andy Baker

  • Kevin H O'Rouke

  • Richard Sinnott

  • Andy Baker

  • Marilyn Carr

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