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A meta-analysis of work engagement: Relationships with burnout, demands, resources and consequences

Halbesleben J ...see all

Work engagement: A handbook of essential theory and research (2010) pp. 102-117 Published by Psychology Press

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Abstract

As research on engagement has expanded very quickly, a need has emerged for a synthesis of existing empirical studies. Thus, the purpose of this chapter is to provide a meta-analysis of the correlates of engagement. To that end, the author offers a very brief summary of the expected relationships from the literature. I discuss the manner in which the meta-analysis was carried out along with its primary findings. Based on the previous literature, the author hypothesizes the following: Hypothesis 1: Dimensions of engagement should be negatively associated with dimensions of burnout. Specifically, it is expected that vigor will be most strongly and negatively associated with exhaustion and dedication will be most strongly and negatively associated with cynicism. Hypothesis 2: Resources will be positively associated with engagement. Specifically, social support, autonomy, feedback, positive organizational climate, and self-efficacy will be positively associated with engagement. Hypothesis 3a: Demands will be negatively associated with work engagement. Specifically, work overload, work-family conflict, and family-work conflict will be negatively associated with engagement. Hypothesis 3b: The relationship between job demands and engagement will be weaker than the relationship between resources and engagement. Hypothesis 4: Work engagement will be positively associated with positive outcomes at work. Specifically, engagement will be positively associated with organizational commitment, performance, and health. Engagement will be negatively associated with turnover intentions. To summarize, the author found, with a few exceptions, that work engagement constructs were negatively associated with burnout as predicted by the literature. Also as predicted, resources were positively related and demands were negatively related to engagement, but resources were much more strongly related. Finally, engagement was positively associated with positive outcomes at work, including a stronger relationship between dedication—an identification-based component of engagement—and commitment and turnover intention. The chapter ends with a discussion of the current state of the empirical engagement literature and suggestions for future research. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2012 APA, all rights reserved)

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Authors

  • J. R. B. Halbesleben

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