Microstructural status of ipsilesional and contralesional corticospinal tract correlates with motor skill in chronic stroke patients

  • Schaechter J
  • Fricker Z
  • Perdue K
 et al. 
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Abstract

Greater loss in structural integrity of the ipsilesional corticospinal tract (CST) is associated with poorer motor outcome in patients with hemiparetic stroke. Animal models of stroke have demonstrated that structural remodeling of white matter in the ipsilesional and contralesional hemispheres is associated with improved motor recovery. Accordingly, motor recovery in patients with stroke may relate to the relative strength of CST degeneration and remodeling. This study examined the relationship between microstructural status of brain white matter tracts, indexed by the fractional anisotropy (FA) metric derived from diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) data, and motor skill of the stroke-affected hand in patients with chronic stroke. Voxelwise analysis revealed that motor skill significantly and positively correlated with FA of the ipsilesional and contralesional CST in the patients. Additional voxelwise analyses showed that patients with poorer motor skill had reduced FA of bilateral CST compared to normal control subjects, whereas patients with better motor skill had elevated FA of bilateral CST compared to controls. These findings were confirmed using a DTI-tractography method applied to the CST in both hemispheres. The results of this study suggest that the level of motor skill recovery achieved in patients with hemiparetic stroke relates to microstructural status of the CST in both the ipsilesional and contralesional hemispheres, which may reflect the net effect of degeneration and remodeling of bilateral CST. Hum Brain Mapp, 2009. © 2009 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

Author-supplied keywords

  • Anisotropy
  • Diffusion tensor imaging
  • Hemiparesis
  • Stroke recovery
  • Tractography
  • White matter

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