Mother-daughter communication about sex and sexual intercourse among middle- to upper-class African American girls

  • Usher-Seriki K
  • Bynum M
  • Callands T
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Abstract

This study investigated linkages between various dimensions of mother– daughter communication about sex and sexual intercourse in a sample of 274 middle- to upper-income African American adolescent girls, drawn from the National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent Health. Logistic regression analysis revealed that girls who reported closer relationships with their moth- ers were less likely to have had sexual intercourse. They were more likely to report a history of sexual intercourse when their mothers communicated fre- quently about sexual topics and when daughters perceived their mothers as being more approving of premarital sex. Daughters were less likely to be sex- ually active when their mothers reported more discussions related to the neg- ative consequences of premarital sex and to delaying sexual intercourse for moral reasons. The implications of these findings for upwardly mobile African American families are discussed.

Author-supplied keywords

  • Adolescents
  • African Americans
  • Mother-child relations
  • Parent-child communication
  • Parenting
  • Psychosexual behavior

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Authors

  • Kimberly K. Usher-Seriki

  • Mia Smith Bynum

  • Tamora A. Callands

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