A new skull of early Homo from Dmanisi, Georgia

  • Vekua A
  • Lordkipanidze D
  • Rightmire G
 et al. 
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Another hominid skull has been recovered at Dmanisi (Republic of Georgia) from the same strata in which hominid remains have been reported previously. The Dmanisi site dated to approximately 1.75 million years ago has now produced craniofacial portions of several hominid individuals, along with many well-preserved animal fossils and quantities of stone artifacts. Although there are certain anatomical differences among the Dmanisi specimens, the hominids do not clearly represent more than one taxon. We assign the new skull provisionally to Homo erectus (=ergaster). The Dmanisi specimens are the most primitive and small-brained fossils to be grouped with this species or any taxon linked unequivocally with genus Homo and also the ones most similar to the presumed habilis-like stem. We suggest that the ancestors of the Dmanisi population dispersed from Africa before the emergence of humans identified broadly with the H. erectus grade.

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  • Abesalom Vekua

  • David Lordkipanidze

  • G. Philip Rightmire

  • Jordi Agusti

  • Reid Ferring

  • Givi Maisuradze

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