PERMEABILITY AND IMPERMEABILITY OF CELL MEMBRANES FOR IONS

  • Cole K
  • 53

    Readers

    Mendeley users who have this article in their library.
  • N/A

    Citations

    Citations of this article.

Abstract

Ion PermeabilityThe ion permeability of the plasma membrane has long been recognized as an important problem in cell function. A considerable portion of present day blood chemistry, for example, depends upon a membrane permeability to ions. On the other hand, many osmotic measurements of the membrane permeability to water and molecular solutes have been interpreted on the assumption of a negligible ion permeability. A permeability may be defined phenomenologically as the amount of substance transported across a unit area in unit time as the result of a unit force. The most convenient and widely used driving force is that of a concentration gradient which applies to both molecules and ions. It is quite obvious that a more direct measurement of the ion permeability might be expected from the application of a gradient of electrical potential which will tend to move only the ions--and when the ions move, they constitute...

Get free article suggestions today

Mendeley saves you time finding and organizing research

Sign up here
Already have an account ?Sign in

Find this document

Authors

  • K. S. Cole

Cite this document

Choose a citation style from the tabs below

Save time finding and organizing research with Mendeley

Sign up for free