Predicting Problem Gambling in Australian Adults Using a Multifaceted Model of Impulsivity

  • Blain B
  • Richard Gill P
  • Teese R
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Abstract

Impulsivity is a factor that has been linked strongly to problem gambling; however, conceptualization problems have impeded research in this area. Research suggests that there may be as many as five impulsivity subtypes and that some but not all of these subtypes are involved in problem gambling. This cross-sectional and correlational study used the multifaceted UPPS-P Impulsive Behaviour Scale as a predictor of problem gambling in a community (N = 200) sample of Australian adult gamblers. Of the five impulsivity subtypes, negative urgency, positive urgency and sensation seeking were found to be positively related to problem gambling, while lack of premeditation and lack of perseverance were unrelated. Multiple regression analyses revealed that positive urgency and negative urgency were the only significant predictors of problem gambling, suggesting that individuals who have the tendency to act rashly when in a positive or negative mood are more likely to display problem gambling behaviour. The results provide further evidence of the significant role of strong emotions in problem gambling. Further, it appears that problem gambling can be motivated both by the impulsive desire to avoid negative mood states and by the impulsive desire to maintain and enhance positive mood states. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2015 APA, all rights reserved) (journal abstract)

Author-supplied keywords

  • emotion regulation
  • impulsivity
  • mood
  • negative urgency
  • positive urgency
  • problem gambling

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