Predicting response to cognitive-behavioral therapy in a sample of HIV-positive patients with chronic pain

  • Cucciare M
  • Sorrell J
  • Trafton J
  • 4

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Abstract

INTRODUCTION: The primary aim of this study was to examine the role of patient characteristics in predicting response to treatment in a sample of HIV-positive patients receiving 12 weekly sessions of a CBT-based pain management protocol. METHOD: A pre/post test single group design was used. Pain-related functioning was assessed at baseline and 12 weeks post-treatment using the Pain Outcomes Questionnaire-VA. DATA ANALYSIS AND RESULTS: Multivariate regression analysis showed that higher baseline levels of pain-related anxiety were related to greater improvement in pain-related functioning at post-treatment, and non-Caucasian participants reported a greater response to treatment when compared to Caucasian participants. Attendance to CBT treatment sessions focused on progressive muscle relaxation and cognitive reconceptualization of pain were also related to treatment outcome. CONCLUSION: Non-Caucasian patients reporting higher levels of pain-related anxiety may respond particularly well to treatment. Treatment sessions focused on progressive muscle relaxation and cognitive reconceptualization of pain may be particularly helpful.

Author-supplied keywords

  • Chronic pain management
  • Cognitive behavioral therapy
  • HIV-positive
  • Pain-related anxiety

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Authors

  • M A Cucciare

  • J T Sorrell

  • J A Trafton

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