Predictors of treatment outcome for binge eating disorder.

  • Peterson C
  • Crow S
  • Nugent S
 et al. 
  • 16

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Abstract

OBJECTIVE: The purpose of this study was to identify predictors of short-term treatment outcome for individuals with binge eating disorder (BED). METHOD: Fifty women who met DSM-IV criteria for BED were enrolled in a manual-based group cognitive-behavioral therapy that consisted of fourteen 1-hr sessions over an 8-week period. Baseline measures included the frequency of self-reported binge eating from the Eating Behaviors-IV (EB-IV), severity of binge eating and dietary restraint using the Binge Eating Scale (BES) and Three-Factor Eating Questionnaire (TFEQ), depressive symptoms as assessed by the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI) and the Hamilton Depression Rating Scale (HDRS), and self-esteem as measured by the Rosenberg Self-Esteem Questionnaire (RSEQ). RESULTS: Logistic regression analyses indicated that the baseline frequency of self-reported episodes of binge eating that were objectively large predicted the likelihood of such episodes at the end of treatment. No variables predicted the likelihood of binge eating episodes that were objectively and subjectively large at the conclusion of treatment. DISCUSSION: This study indicates that the frequency of binge eating episodes at baseline is predictive of outcome status at the end of treatment, suggesting that meaningful prognostic factors in BED are identifiable.

Author-supplied keywords

  • binge eating
  • binge eating disorder
  • cognitive-behavioral therapy
  • treatment out-

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Authors

  • C B Peterson

  • S J Crow

  • S Nugent

  • J E Mitchell

  • S Engbloom

  • M P Mussell

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