Prevalence, Correlates, Disability, and Comorbidity of DSM-IV Drug Abuse and Dependence in the United States: Results From the National Epidemiologic Survey on Alcohol and Related Conditions

  • Compton W
  • Thomas Y
  • Stinson F
 et al. 
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BACKGROUND: Current and comprehensive information on the epidemiology of DSM-IV 12-month and lifetime drug use disorders in the United States has not been available. OBJECTIVES: To present detailed information on drug abuse and dependence prevalence, correlates, and comorbidity with other Axis I and II disorders. Design, Setting, and PARTICIPANTS: Face-to-face interviews using the Alcohol Use Disorder and Associated Disabilities Interview Schedule of the National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism in a large representative sample of US adults (N = 43 093). MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Twelve-month and lifetime prevalence of drug abuse and dependence and the associated correlates, treatment rates, disability, and comorbidity with other Axis I and II disorders. RESULTS: Prevalences of 12-month and lifetime drug abuse (1.4% and 7.7%, respectively) exceeded rates of drug dependence (0.6% and 2.6%, respectively). Rates of abuse and dependence were generally greater among men, Native Americans, respondents aged 18 to 44 years, those of lower socioeconomic status, those residing in the West, and those who were never married or widowed, separated, or divorced (all P

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  • W M Compton

  • Y F Thomas

  • F S Stinson

  • B F Grant

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