THIS PROTEST WILL BE TWEETED: Twitter and protest policing during the Pittsburgh G20

  • Earl J
  • McKee Hurwitz H
  • Mejia Mesinas A
 et al. 
  • 38

    Readers

    Mendeley users who have this article in their library.
  • 42

    Citations

    Citations of this article.

Abstract

This article examines the use of Twitter at protests surrounding the G20 meetings held in Pittsburgh, PA in September 2009. Based on work on information communi- cation technologies and protest, and on more recent work on Twitter usage at pro- tests, we develop several hypotheses about the content of tweets during protests. Most significantly, we argue that Twitter is a widely available mobile social networking tool that can be used to reduce information asymmetries between protesters and police. Examining the content of 30,296 tweets over a nine-day period, we find that protesters frequently used Twitter to share information, including information about protest locations, as well as the location and actions of police, which is infor- mation that was formerly monopolized by the police. Twitter use may be creating a new dynamic in protester and police interaction toward information symmetries. We conclude by identifying implications for policing practices and for protesters.

Author-supplied keywords

  • Twitter
  • information asymmetry
  • protest
  • protest policing
  • repression

Get free article suggestions today

Mendeley saves you time finding and organizing research

Sign up here
Already have an account ?Sign in

Find this document

Authors

  • Jennifer Earl

  • Heather McKee Hurwitz

  • Analicia Mejia Mesinas

  • Margaret Tolan

  • Ashley Arlotti

Cite this document

Choose a citation style from the tabs below

Save time finding and organizing research with Mendeley

Sign up for free