Psychological maltreatment

  • Hibbard R
  • Barlow J
  • MacMillan H
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Abstract

[Correction Notice: An Erratum for this article was reported in Vol 130(2) of Pediatrics (see record 2013-18439-024). In the original article, The name of the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry was incorrectly printed as Association, rather than Academy and on page 372, under Introduction, second sentence, the date given for the technical report (reference 1) should have been 2002 and not 2000.] Psychological or emotional maltreatment of children may be the most challenging and prevalent form of child abuse and neglect. Caregiver behaviors include acts of omission (ignoring need for social interactions) or commission (spurning, terrorizing); may be verbal or nonverbal, active or passive, and with or without intent to harm; and negatively affect the child's cognitive, social, emotional, and/or physical development. Psychological maltreatment has been linked with disorders of attachment, developmental and educational problems, socialization problems, disruptive behavior, and later psychopathology. Although no evidence-based interventions that can prevent psychological maltreatment have been identified to date, it is possible that interventions shown to be effective in reducing overall types of child maltreatment, such as the Nurse Family Partnership, may have a role to play. Furthermore, prevention before occurrence will require both the use of universal interventions aimed at promoting the type of parenting that is now recognized to be necessary for optimal child development, alongside the use of targeted interventions directed at improving parental sensitivity to a child's cues during infancy and later parent-child interactions. Intervention should, first and foremost, focus on a thorough assessment and ensuring the child's safety. Potentially effective treatments include cognitive behavioral parenting programs and other psychotherapeutic interventions. The high prevalence of psychological abuse in advanced Western societies, along with the serious consequences, point to the importance of effective management. Pediatricians should be alert to the occurrence of psychological maltreatment and identify ways to support families who have risk indicators for, or evidence of, this problem. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2016 APA, all rights reserved)

Author-supplied keywords

  • *Child Abuse *Child Neglect *Emotional Abuse Psych

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Authors

  • Roberta Hibbard

  • Jane Barlow

  • Harriet MacMillan

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