Reducing organizational conflict: The role of socially-induced positive affect

  • Baron R
  • Fortin S
  • Frei R
 et al. 
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Abstract

Two studies were conducted to investigate the impact of socially induced positive affect on organizational conflict. In Study 1, Ss were provoked or not provoked, and then exposed to one of several treatments designed to induce positive affect among them. Results indicated that several of these procedures (e.g., mild flattery, a small gift, self-deprecating remarks by an opponent) increased Ss' preference for resolving conflict through collaboration, but reduced their preference for resolving conflict through competition. In addition, self-deprecating remarks by an opponent increased Ss' willingness to make concessions to this person during negotiations. In Study 2, Ss were exposed to 2 treatments designed to induce positive affect (humorous remarks, mild flattery). These were presented before, during or after negotiations with another person. Both treatments reduced Ss' preferences for resolving conflict through avoidance and increased their preferences for resolving conflict through collaboration, but only when delivered during or immediately after negotiations. Together, the results of both studies suggest that simple interventions designed to induce positive affect among the parties to conflicts can yield several beneficial effects. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2004 APA, all rights reserved)

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