The relations between phonological processing abilities and emerging individual differences in mathematical computation skills: A longitudinal study from second to fifth grades

  • Hecht S
  • Torgesen J
  • Wagner R
 et al. 
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Abstract

The primary purpose of this longitudinal correlational study was to examine relations between phonological processing abilities and emerging individual differences in math computation skills and also to investigate the source of covariation between reading and math computation skills in a random sample (n = 201). Phonological memory, rate of access to phonological codes in long-term memory, and phonological awareness were uniquely associated with growth in estimated total number of computation procedures mastered (general computation skills) from 92.5 to 134.8 months in age, although the contributions of the first two abilities were developmentally limited. Phonological processing almost completely accounted for the associations between reading and general computation skills. Evidence of bidirectional relations between general computation skills and simple arithmetic problem solving speed was found. © 2001 Academic Press.

Author-supplied keywords

  • Arithmetic
  • Mathematical achievement
  • Mathematical cognition
  • Mathematical computation
  • Phonological processing
  • Reading and mathematics

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Authors

  • Steven A. Hecht

  • Joseph K. Torgesen

  • Richard K. Wagner

  • Carol A. Rashotte

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