THE ROLE OF CONSTRUCTIVE TYPOLOGY IN SCIENTIFIC SOCIOLOGICAL ANALYSIS.

  • McKinney J
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Abstract

John Dewey once characterized Americans as a people thirsty for absolutes. In the areas of culture and civilization, however, it appears that not too much progress has been made toward a definitive distinction. The "Cumulative Book Index" lists five cross references for "culture"—civilization, value of college education, learning and scholarship, self culture and education. This paper represents an attempt to clarify the structure of the concepts culture and civilization to the end that a more definitive use of the terms may be proposed. It also will attempt to provide illustrations of various ways the terms themselves have been and are being used. In order to begin such a review it becomes necessary to propose certain limitations of meaning and usage that will allow the reader to follow the discussion more readily. An attempt was made to clarify the structure of the concepts culture and civilization by the use of a schematic design within which were placed arbitrary thresholds designating different stages in the development of man's non-biologic life.

Author-supplied keywords

  • 1859-1952
  • CIVILIZATION
  • CULTURE
  • DEWEY
  • EDUCATION
  • John
  • LEARNING
  • UNITED States

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Authors

  • John C McKinney

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