Roots under attack: Contrasting plant responses to below- and aboveground insect herbivory

  • Johnson S
  • Erb M
  • Hartley S
  • 76

    Readers

    Mendeley users who have this article in their library.
  • 22

    Citations

    Citations of this article.

Abstract













413


I.

413


II.

414


III.

414


IV.

415


V.

416


VI.

417


VII.

417




417



References
417







Summary
The distinctive ecology of root herbivores, the complexity and diversity of root–microbe interactions, and the physical nature of the soil matrix mean that plant responses to root herbivory extrapolate poorly from our understanding of responses to aboveground herbivores. For example, root attack induces different changes in phytohormones to those in damaged leaves, including a lower but more potent burst of jasmonates in several plant species. Root secondary metabolite responses also differ markedly, although patterns between roots and shoots are harder to discern. Root defences must therefore be investigated in their own ecophysiological and evolutionary context, specifically one which incorporates root microbial symbionts and antagonists, if we are to better understand the battle between plants and their hidden herbivores.

Author-supplied keywords

  • Defensive responses
  • Folivores
  • Herbivores
  • Photoassimilates
  • Phytohormones
  • Root feeding
  • Secondary metabolites

Get free article suggestions today

Mendeley saves you time finding and organizing research

Sign up here
Already have an account ?Sign in

Find this document

Get full text

Authors

  • Scott N. Johnson

  • Matthias Erb

  • Susan E. Hartley

Cite this document

Choose a citation style from the tabs below

Save time finding and organizing research with Mendeley

Sign up for free