Self-regulation in online learning

  • Cho M
  • Shen D
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Abstract

The purpose of this study was to examine the role of goal orientation and academic self-efficacy in student achievement mediated by effort regulation, metacognitive regulation, and interaction regulation in an online course. The results show that intrinsic goal orientation and academic self-efficacy predicted students’ metacognitive self-regulation; however, extrinsic goal orientation did not predict any type of regulation. Effort regulation and the amount of time spent in Blackboard predicted students’ academic achievement in the course, and interaction regulation predicted the amount of time spent in the online course. Results show the importance of individual students’ intrinsic goal orientation and academic self-efficacy in academic achievement. Discussion relates to current research and implications for online teaching and learning practice.

Author-supplied keywords

  • academic self-efficacy
  • effort regulation
  • goal orientations
  • interaction regulation
  • metacognitive regulation
  • online learning

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