Self-serving bias and self-deception

  • Von Hippel W
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Abstract

Three experiments tested the hypothesis self-serving biases are self-deceptive in nature. Consistent with this hypothesis, Experiment 1 revealed that people who rated a task at which they succeeded as more important than a task at which they failed also cheated on a series of math problems, but only when they could excuse their cheating as unintentional. Experiment 2 replicated this finding and demonstrated that a self-report measure of self-deception did not predict this self-deceptive cheating. Experiment 3 replicated Experiments 1 and 2 and ruled out several alternative explanations. These experiments suggest that selfserving biases have a self-deceptive component, and that individual differences in self-deception can be measured. ABSTRACT FROM AUTHOR Copyright of Australian Journal of Psychology is the property of Taylor & Francis Ltd and its content may not be copied or emailed to multiple sites or posted to a listserv without the copyright holder's express written permission. However, users may print, download, or email articles for individual use. This abstract may be abridged. No warranty is given about the accuracy of the copy. Users should refer to the original published version of the material for the full abstract. (Copyright applies to all Abstracts) Three experiments tested the hypothesis self-serving biases are self-deceptive in nature. Consistent with this hypothesis, Experiment 1 revealed that people who rated a task at which they succeeded as more important than a task at which they failed also cheated on a series of math problems, but only when they could excuse their cheating as unintentional. Experiment 2 replicated this finding and demonstrated that a self-report measure of self-deception did not predict this self-deceptive cheating. Experiment 3 replicated Experiments 1 and 2 and ruled out several alternative explanations. These experiments suggest that selfserving biases have a self-deceptive component, and that individual differences in self-deception can be measured. ABSTRACT FROM AUTHOR Copyright of Australian Journal of Psychology is the property of Taylor & Francis Ltd and its content may not be copied or emailed to multiple sites or posted to a listserv without the copyright holder's express written permission. However, users may print, download, or email articles for individual use. This abstract may be abridged. No warranty is given about the accuracy of the copy. Users should refer to the original published version of the material for the full abstract. (Copyright applies to all Abstracts)

Author-supplied keywords

  • PREJUDICES
  • SELF-deception
  • SELF-perception

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Authors

  • W Von Hippel

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