Skip to content
Book section

What sort of ideas become public ideas?

The power of public ideas, issue 3 (1990) pp. 55-84 Published by Harvard University Press

  • 12

    Readers

    Mendeley users who have this article in their library.
  • N/A

    Citations

    Citations of this article.
  • N/A

    Views

    ScienceDirect users who have downloaded this article.
Sign in to save reference

Abstract

CERTAIN NORMATIVE IDEAS ARE PARTICULARLY POWERFUL FOR ORGANIZING HOW PEOPLE THINK ABOUT PUBLIC PROBLEMS AND FOR MOBILIZING THEM TO TAKE ACTION. THIS CHAPTER EXPLORES FOUR SUBSEQUENT QUESTIONS: WHERE DO WE SEE THE EFFECTS OF THESE IDEAS? HOW DO WE KNOW THAT ANY OBSERVED EFFECTS ARE THE EFFECTS OF PUBLIC IDEAS AND NOT PRIVATE INTERESTS? WHAT SORTS OF IDEAS BECOME IMPORTANT? AND HOW CAN SUCH IDEAS BE CREATED? IF ONE THINKS OF PUBLIC POLICY AS IDEAS THAT HAVE POWER IN GUIDING PUBLIC ACTIONS RATHER THAN AS AN ABSTRACT SET OF TECHIQUES FOR DEVELOPING TESTING IDEAS, THEN THESE QUESTIONS ARE THE MOST FUNDAMENTAL IN THE FIELD

Author-supplied keywords

  • Developing Evidence-Based Practices
  • EBP Project
  • policy
  • policymaking
  • politics
  • public ideas
  • public policy

Find this document

Authors

Error loading document authors.

Cite this document

Choose a citation style from the tabs below