Testing the indirect effect of trait mindfulness on adolescent cigarette smoking through negative affect and perceived stress mediators

  • Black D
  • Sussman S
  • Johnson C
 et al. 
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Abstract

Mindfulness refers to an enhanced attention to and awareness of present moment experience. This study examined how trait mindfulness, as measured with six items from Mindfulness Attention Awareness Scale, might influence adolescent cigarette smoking frequency through its impact on depressive affect, anger affect and perceived stress mediators. Self-reported data from Chinese adolescents (N = 5287, mean age = 16.2 years, SD = 0.7; 48.8% females) were collected within 24 schools. The product of coefficients test was used to determine significant mediation paths. Results from baseline cross-sectional data indicated that trait mindfulness had a significant indirect effect on past 30-day smoking frequency through depressive affect, anger affect and perceived stress mediators. Results from 13-month longitudinal data indicated that these indirect effects remained significant for depressive affect and perceived stress but not for anger affect. Findings from this study may suggest that heightening mindfulness among adolescents may indirectly reduce cigarette smoking perhaps by improving affect regulation competencies.

Author-supplied keywords

  • Adolescents
  • Affect regulation
  • Mediation
  • Mindfulness
  • Smoking

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Authors

  • David S. Black

  • Steve Sussman

  • C. Anderson Johnson

  • Joel Milam

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