The time course effect of moderate intensity exercise on response execution and response inhibition

  • Joyce J
  • Graydon J
  • McMorris T
 et al. 
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Abstract

This research aimed to investigate the time course effect of a moderate steady-state exercise session on response execution and response inhibition using a stop-task paradigm. Ten participants performed a stop-signal task whilst cycling at a carefully controlled workload intensity (40% of maximal aerobic power), immediately following exercise and 30min after exercise cessation. Results showed that moderate exercise enhances a subjects' ability to execute responses under time pressure (shorter Go reaction time, RT without a change in accuracy) but also enhances a subjects' ability to withhold ongoing motor responses (shorter stop-signal RT). The present outcomes reveal that the beneficial effect of exercise is neither limited to motor response tasks, nor to cognitive tasks performed during exercise. Beneficial effects of exercise remain present on both response execution and response inhibition performance for up to 52min after exercise cessation.

Author-supplied keywords

  • *Cognition
  • *Psychomotor Performance
  • Analysis of Variance
  • Exercise/*psychology
  • Female
  • Humans
  • Male
  • Motor Activity
  • Neuropsychological Tests
  • Reaction Time
  • Task Performance and Analysis
  • Time Factors
  • Young Adult

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Authors

  • J Joyce

  • J Graydon

  • T McMorris

  • K Davranche

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