TIMING AND DISTANCE OF KING EIDER MIGRATION AND WINTER MOVEMENTS

  • OPPEL S
  • POWELL A
  • DICKSON D
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Abstract

Abstract Understanding the patterns, extent, and phenology of migration is important for estimating potential influences of habitat or climate changes on populations of migratory birds. We used satellite telemetry of >100 individual King Eiders (Somateria spectabilis) tagged in northwestern North America in 2002–2006 to describe the timing and extent of their migration and winter movements in the Bering Sea. We found high variability in timing of migration events and distances flown. Arrival on breeding grounds and onset of molt migration were the least variable events in duration. Fall migration was extremely variable, ranging from less than a week to several months. More than a third of King Eiders did not migrate after wing molt and wintered on or near wing-molting areas. We found diffuse migratory connectivity between breeding and wintering areas, and low intrayear fidelity to 25 km radius wintering sites. More than half of the King Eiders used several wintering sites in a given year, and their winter...

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Authors

  • STEFFEN OPPEL

  • ABBY N. POWELL

  • D. LYNNE DICKSON

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