Type 2 angiotensin II receptor is downregulated in cardiomyocytes of patients with heart failure.

  • Matsumoto T
  • Ozono R
  • Oshima T
 et al. 
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Abstract

BACKGROUND: The human heart expresses type 2 angiotensin (AT(2)) receptor, but the function is poorly defined. METHODS: In the present study, we investigated (1) the cellular localization of the AT(2) receptor and (2) the relationship between the AT(2) receptor protein expression and the cardiac function of patients with ischemic heart disease. The receptor localization was assessed by immunohistochemistry and the protein expression was quantified by Western blotting in atrial tissues freshly obtained from 22 patients undergoing coronary artery bypass graft surgery (63.0+/-11.0 years old; male ratio, 85%). Prior to the surgery, blood was drawn for determination of atrial-natriuretic hormone level and the left ventricular function was assessed by ultrasound cardiography. RESULTS: The results of immunohistochemistry showed that the AT(2) receptor was localized to cardiomyocytes and was not present in fibroblasts, vascular smooth muscles, or vascular endothelium. Atrial tissues showed various degrees of structural remodeling, but the localization of the AT(2) receptor was not altered in any tissue sections. The amount of the AT(2) receptor was negatively correlated with end-diastolic left ventricular diastolic dimension (r=-0.56, P

Author-supplied keywords

  • angiotensin
  • coronary disease
  • fibrosis
  • heart failure
  • ischemia
  • myocytes
  • receptors
  • ventricular function

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Authors

  • T Matsumoto

  • R Ozono

  • T Oshima

  • H Matsuura

  • T Sueda

  • G Kajiyama

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