UNDERGRADUATES’ LEARNING STYLE SAND COMFORT WITH EXPERIENTIAL LEARNING IN AN INTERDISCIPLINARY COURSE FOCUSING ON HORTICULTURE AND AGRICULTURAL EDUCATION

  • Lynnette Davis, Cary J. Trexler D
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Abstract

In response to calls for educational reform, an innovative course based on experiential learning was created at a land grant university. Researchers observing the undergraduate course explored the possibility that individual learning styles may have affected students’ comfort in the classroom and their subsequent learning in the novel educational setting. Students from the course were interviewed and their learning styles were classified using Kolb’s Learning Style Inventory (LSI). Researchers concluded that students’ learning styles did not affect their classroom comfort and learning in the course. It appeared that the experiential nature of the course allowed students of all learning styles to capitalize on their learning strengths and to strengthen underutilized ways of learning. This study has implications for instructors who seek to maximize student learning by utilizing the principles of learning styles when designing and implementing courses based on experiential learning theory.

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Authors

  • Davis Cynthia Haynes Lynnette Davis, Cary J. Trexler

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