Acute rejection after kidney transplantation promotes graft fibrosis with elevated adenosine level in rat

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Abstract

Aims Chronic allograft nephropathy is a worldwide issue with the major feature of progressive allograft fibrosis, eventually ending with graft loss. Adenosine has been demonstrated to play an important role in process of fibrosis. Our study aimed to investigate the relationship between adenosine and fibrosis in renal allograft acute rejection in rat. Materials and methods Wistar rats and SD rats were selected as experimental animals. Our study designed two groups. In the allograft transplantation group, kidneys of Wistar rats were orthotopically transplanted into SD rat recipients, the same species but not genetically identical, to induce acute rejection. Kidney transplantations of SD rats to SD rats which were genetically identical were served as the control. We established rat models and detected a series of indicators. All data were analyzed statistically. P<0.05 was considered statistically significant. Results Compared with the control group, levels of adenosine increased significantly in the allograft transplantation group, in which acute rejection was induced (P<0.05). Progressive allograft fibrosis as well as collagen deposition were observed. Conclusions These findings suggested that level of adenosine was upregulated in acute rejection after kidney allograft transplantation in rat. Acute rejection may promote renal allograft fibrosis via the adenosine signaling pathways.

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Li, M., Dai, Y., Lei, J., Tang, J., Zhou, Y., Xia, B., … Yin, G. (2017). Acute rejection after kidney transplantation promotes graft fibrosis with elevated adenosine level in rat. PLoS ONE, 12(6). https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0180211

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