Increased serum levels of advanced glycation end-products is associated with severity of sleep disordered breathing but not insulin sensitivity in non-diabetic men with obstructive sleep apnoea

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Abstract

Background: Patients with diabetes mellitus are known to have increased serum levels of advanced glycation end-products (AGEs), and this is also associated with insulin resistance. This study aimed to investigate the relationship between serum AGEs and insulin sensitivity in non-diabetic subjects with obstructive sleep apnoea (OSA). Methods: Adult males with no known comorbidities were recruited from the sleep clinic of a university teaching hospital. They underwent overnight in-laboratory polysomnography. Fasting blood was taken to measure serum AGE and plasma glucose levels. Insulin sensitivity was estimated using the short insulin tolerance test. Results: In total, 105 subjects with a mean age of 43.5 (standard deviation [SD] 9.2)years, mean body mass index of 27.1 (SD 4.0)kg/m2, and median apnoea-hypopnoea index (AHI) of 17 (interquartile range 5-46) were analysed. Serum AGE levels were significantly higher in subjects with OSA (AHI ≥5), compared with those without OSA (AHI <5) (3.9 [SD 1.2] vs. 3.2 [SD 0.8]μg/ml, respectively; P=0.037) after adjusting for confounders. AGE levels were positively correlated with AHI (r=0.318, P=0.001), but not with insulin sensitivity. AGE levels decreased in subjects with moderate-to-severe OSA who received continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) treatment for threemonths (n=18, P=0.017). Conclusions: Serum AGE levels correlate with AHI in non-diabetic adult males. This relationship cannot be explained by insulin sensitivity. Supporting the hypothesis of a direct relationship between AHI and AGEs, AGE levels were found to decline with CPAP therapy. © 2011 Elsevier B.V.

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Lam, J. C. M., Tan, K. C. B., Lai, A. Y. K., Lam, D. C. L., & Ip, M. S. M. (2012). Increased serum levels of advanced glycation end-products is associated with severity of sleep disordered breathing but not insulin sensitivity in non-diabetic men with obstructive sleep apnoea. Sleep Medicine, 13(1), 15–20. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.sleep.2011.07.015

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